reviews

Mercury by Ariana Reines

Mercury is a book untamed, untamable, compulsively readable and often repellant, and to finish it is to find yourself staring back into your eyes, the book just a mirror in your hands.—DAN BEACHY-QUICK

http://www.bucknell.edu/x79980.xml


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

Moshfegh’s novel calls to mind the blackness, torment, and self-infliction of Poe and Robert W. Chambers, and the sensory detail, guttural prose, raw wit, and sincerity of Wells Tower’s “Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned.” McGlue has the urgency of short fiction married with the grandiosity of an epic at-sea classic.—ZACHARY TYLER VICKERS

http://lareviewofbooks.org/review/tidings#


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

If one can study misery, Ottessa Moshfegh offers a master class with her debut. Whether or not doom is chosen, the narrative proves there is, in fact, "something like grace" in watching it unfold.—LINNIE GREENE

http://www.shelf-awareness.com/readers-issue.html?issue=347#m6128


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

McGlue is about a brash yet eloquent drunkard (that’s McGlue), and it’s set in the 19th century, and has a definite olden-times, sea-faring vibe. This is strange because the rest of Mosfegh’s stuff is pretty modern, but she dives into the voice of McGlue with such commitment and verve that I stopped worrying and learned to love it.—JACOB KAPLAN

http://www.imposemagazine.com/bytes/bookish/that-new-new-in-lit-october


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

If there’s anything scarier than killing someone you love, it’s not knowing if you did.—TIFFANY GIBERT

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/books/8-scary-stories-for-the-halloween-season


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

To read McGlue is to be aware of how unmistakably different it is. The term “voice” has too much essentialist baggage — it lowballs the composition involved with sentence-making on Moshfegh’s level. But there’s no other available shorthand for what makes McGlue — literary cul-de-sac, perhaps — a thing of beauty. From where I sit, I still want to be passed a killer note like this one, a doodle of a ship on choppy seas, writing that is what it is with strange aplomb.—M.C. MAH

http://www.full-stop.net/2014/11/03/reviews/m-c-mah/mcglue-ottessa-moshfegh/


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

In McGlue, Moshfegh’s facility with voice (here she’s inhabiting that of a 19th century scoundrel) competes with her ability to expose the gritty, mucky corners of the human condition. “Nothing doing but dark hearts,” McGlue contemplates, showing the reader the omnipresence of so many eternal midnights.—JOANNA NOVAK

http://www.bustle.com/articles/46082-ottessa-moshfegh-is-the-next-big-thing-and-here-are-7-reasons-why


McGlue by Ottessa Moshfegh

Propelled by a masterful combination of lyrical prose, mystery, and plot, McGlue is a highly impressive novel about the oppressed self. Ottessa Moshfegh commands fiction with natural grace and is a modern voice to be reckoned with.—ALEXANDER HELMINTOLLER

http://www.zyzzyva.org/2014/10/05/mcglue-by-ottessa-moshfegh/


Philip Jenks by catalog

http://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/eng_facpub/1/


Mellow Actions by Brandon Downing

With all the sanguine gusto of a super-parasympathetic nervous system that knows neither fight nor flight, Mellow Actions makes for a real wide-open-type palette of dreams.—PAUL EBENKAMP

http://jacket2.org/reviews/cutting-through-its-own-knife


Undergloom by Prageeta Sharma

What happens to the woman of color body as it endures the banal repression of the academy? And if it aches to be itself without pressure to conform and meet assumed burdens to produce, publish, and exhaust itself to ‘fit’ while concurrently losing itself? Undergloom by Prageeta Sharma explores the thingification of the woman scholar and the way her mind must adapt to a tepid environment.—JANICE SAPIGAO

http://jacket2.org/reviews/navigating-ineffable


Inter Arma by Lauren Shufran

Here burns an homological alchemy of desire, hate, fear, and murderous aggression that reveals the complex intersections of homophobic, genocidal, and carnivorous urges: Shufran’s an anti-Aesop of geese on hunger strike, of a Private macho to get fucked in barracks in his Gaga-drag, of sheep fallen so far past pastoral they’re water-boarded in a wishing well, knitting Afghans of their own wool.—JUDITH GOLDMAN

http://www.drunkenboat.com/?p=3850


House of Deer by Sasha Steensen

What kind of poem is the kind of poem where everything— including the clothing of children & the doing of dishes— belongs? I think House of Deer is exactly the kind of capacious poem where this everything belongs.—PATTIE MCCARTHY

http://jacket2.org/commentary/sasha-steensens-house-deer-other-domestic-histories


House of Deer by Sasha Steensen

House of Deer is a command of a book—you must experience this—a book that hums with deliberate strangeness, an afternoon heavy with humidity and the unrelenting buzz of insects.—MOLLY SUTTON KIEFER

http://therumpus.net/2014/07/house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/


House of Deer by Sasha Steensen

Steensen’s lyrical poetry is full of fantastical imagery that will allow her readers to look at the ‘70s and the concept of a “family unit” through a different lens and gain new insight into why some families become dysfunctional.—AMANDA FERRIS

http://theabsolutemag.com/15542/books/travel-back-in-time-to-the-1970s-with-sasha-steensens-house-of-deer/


Collapsible Poetics Theater by Rodrigo Toscano

The conflation of artistic genres within conceptual Latino/a poetry is most dynamically presented in Collapsible Poetics Theater (2008), where the text doubles as poetry and stage directions, emphasizing subversive ideas such as “social-psychological crisis,” the “trans-modern,” and the drive to “recombine” paradigms of thought along a proletarian historical continuum.—DAVID A. COLON

http://jacket2.org/article/avant-latino-poetry


The Meatgirl Whatever by Kristin Hatch

What Hatch does with language is rough, and I believe her. Or it’s that feelings are rough and she turns them into words we want to hear. Buried in linguistic shortcuts, the smallness and loss that comes with taking away the words that don’t matter or do and leaving in or making the only ones that will help a reader feel and feel more, we get a sense of this book’s through-line. There’s something traumatic, in the end, about this collection.—COLETTE LABOUFF

http://therumpus.net/2014/06/the-meatgirl-whatever-by-kristin-hatch/


House of Deer by Sasha Steensen

By turns aphoristic and impenetrable, Sasha Steensen has an ear for the strange. She can be playful like Hopkins, whom she styles herself after in a poem called “Fragments” and whose name she takes for the family’s street. Neat as Russian nesting dolls, these poems have a cumulative power.—LAURA CRESTE

http://www.full-stop.net/2014/06/18/reviews/laura-creste/house-of-deer-sasha-steensen/


Your Invitation to a Modest Breakfast by Hannah Gamble

Hannah Gamble’s collection is a refreshingly honest depiction of insecurity and loneliness. Perhaps a bit obsessively, I’ve read Your Invitation to a Modest Breakfast three times since December, and in my ever-so-modest opinion, I’d say it gets even better with age.—DANA JOHNSON

http://gentwenty.com/book-review-invitation-modest-breakfast-hannah-gamble/


House of Deer by Sasha Steensen

Steensen’s book dedication reads, “For my families." One section, “The Girl and the Deer,” tells a contemporary fable about an abandoned child raised by deer. The concept of having family outside of blood and why that matters speaks to a bigger idea of how exclusive (or inclusive) family can be. Family is House of Deer’s central focus because of its natural ability to answer questions of belonging, both to a place and to a group of people.—NATHAN KEMP

http://www.americanmicroreviews.com/#!house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/cvlb


88 Sonnets by Clark Coolidge

Through the music of their phrasing, Coolidge’s sonnets push us to feel the intense but fleeting pleasures in those ephemeral utterances that, while apprehended, cannot always be fully understood. Like the alienated majesty of chitchat overheard from passersby coming back to you as your own best thoughts.—TIM WOOD

http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/reviews/88-sonnets/


Your Invitation to a Modest Breakfast by Hannah Gamble

The secret to Hannah Gamble’s charm lies in her uncanny ability to hold reality and a quiet, seemingly commonplace sadness squarely in her binocular-like vision. Her poems of quirky self-admonishment and effective disengagement are delivered in a style whose dizzying effects you are not likely to forget.—MARK ELEVELD

http://www.raintaxi.com/your-invitation-to-a-modest-breakfast/


Inter Arma by Lauren Shufran

I chose Inter Arma, a book of poems mostly in forms, to win the first ever Ottoline Prize from Fence Books because it is clever and dirty and political graffiti—on the subjects of homosexuality; the military; homosexuality in the military; and ducks.—REBECCA WOLFF

http://www.poetrysociety.org/psa/poetry/crossroads/new_american_poets/lauren_shufran/


Inter Arma by Lauren Shufran

The collection of poems swells with stars, including former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, media mogul Rupert Murdoch, emperor Napoleon Bonaparte, and Roman poet boy Ovid. There are also a lot of animals, which is admirable, as it sort of gives Lauren’s poems Disney-like parts. Chickens, ducks, turkeys, pigeons, and gooses receive roles.—SETH OELBAUM

http://htmlgiant.com/author-spotlight/a-close-reading-of-a-poem-by-a-girl/


88 Sonnets by Clark Coolidge

An engagement with language's musicality plays a significant role in the writing of Clark Coolidge. His poetical works are diverse in form and content reflecting the longevity of his career, and yet an interest in bebop continues to influence his writing. 88 Sonnets is no exception; one trips across these poems with their multitude of riff-like disjuncts, ever aware of his brilliant use of caesura. As one progresses through the text, one finds that the work seems to heave itself together, growing exponentially, far beyond the smallish sonnet form.—MAYA OSBORNE

http://thequietus.com/articles/14299-clark-coolidge-88-sonnets-review


88 Sonnets by Clark Coolidge

Well into his seventies, Coolidge continues to construct a body of poetry that delights, as Auden would say, "in the valley of its making." Coolidge's sonnets create a space where the mind can follow its own fits and leaps in full freedom.

http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/23461


88 Sonnets by Clark Coolidge

Coolidge’s associational writing—not unlike the jazz of Ornette Coleman or the paintings of Philip Guston—achieves its greatness by flirting with incoherence. I find his work inviting. He leaves room for the reader to roam and dream and play. It’s difficult to read any of his texts the same way twice. That strikes me as being very great indeed.—TOM BECKETT

http://galatearesurrection21.blogspot.com/2014/01/88-sonnets-by-clark-coolidge.html


In the Laurels, Caught by Lee Ann Brown

Brown demonstrates a healthy respect for chthonic orders, stringing together a diverse accumulation of poetic stylizations that never looses sight of how much she owes to the land around her, the very environment within which her poetry flourishes.—PATRICK JAMES DUNAGAN

http://galatearesurrection21.blogspot.com/2014/01/books-by-eleni-sikelianos-elizabeth.html


In the Laurels, Caught by Lee Ann Brown

Brown casts a wide net of poetic intersubjectivity, catching up echoes of Stein, Woolf, Niedecker, mystic nature writer Opal Whiteley, bluegrass singers, and samplings from a common domestic lingual trove: weeding instructions, weaving incantations, the tangle talk of childhood which, as a mother, she’s absorbed unapologetically.—MOLLY BENDALL

http://www.lanaturnerjournal.com/contents-current/in-the-laurels-caught-lee-ann-brown


Inter Arma by Lauren Shufran

Inter Arma is a complex combination of classic form, contemporary schism, homophobic militarism, and ancient texts. Its range is wide and deep in the sense that, while it circles around the same images and themes, it invents different linguistic ways to come at these things. The classical references act as a guiding spine for the contemporary political critique in a really difficult and interesting way.—DREW KALBACH

http://thefanzine.com/a-review-of-lauren-shufrans-inter-arma/